Category: General

Scorecards

SCORECARDS
TO ALL MEMBERS:

There have been occasions when it has not been possible for competitors to put their scores into the computer in the lounge due to the clubhouse being closed.
It was also not possible to deposit their scorecard into the box for the same reason.
To overcome this, an out-of-hours box has been fitted to the outside wall of the Professional’s shop and is clearly marked.

This box must only be used to deposit scorecards at the times when access to the clubhouse is not possible.

This is a last resort facility and must not be used to deposit scorecards at any other times.

Competitors who use this facility unnecessarily will be deemed not to have presented their scorecard and normal club sanctions will apply.

COMPS & HANDICAPS

New Rules for 2019

New Rules of Golf are unveiled

The R&A and the USGA have unveiled the new Rules of Golf which will come into force on 1 January 2019.

They were finalised this month after an extensive review that included asking for feedback from the global golf community on the proposed changes.
Most of proposed Rules remain intact in the final version, but there have been several important changes. These include:
• Dropping procedure: When taking relief (from an abnormal course condition or penalty area, for example), golfers will now drop from knee height. This will ensure consistency and simplicity in the dropping process while also preserving the randomness of the drop. (Key change: the proposed Rules released in 2017 suggested dropping from any height).
Measuring in taking relief: The golfer’s relief area will be measured by using the longest club in his/her bag (other than a putter) to measure one club-length or two club-lengths, depending on the situation, providing a consistent process for golfers to establish his/her relief area. (Key change: the proposed Rules released in 2017 suggested a 20-inch or 80-inch standard measurement).
• Removing the penalty for a double hit:  The penalty stroke for accidentally striking the ball more than once in the course of a stroke has been removed. Golfers will simply count the one stroke they made to strike the ball.  (Key change: the proposed Rules released in 2017 included the existing one-stroke penalty).
• Balls Lost or Out of Bounds: Alternative to Stroke and Distance:  A new Local Rule will now be available in January 2019, permitting committees to allow golfers the option to drop the ball in the vicinity of where the ball is lost or out of bounds (including the nearest fairway area), under a two-stroke penalty. It addresses concerns raised at the club level about the negative impact on pace of play when a player is required to go back under stroke and distance. The Local Rule is not intended for higher levels of play, such as professional or elite level competitions. (Key change:  this is a new addition to support pace of play)
David Rickman, Executive Director – Governance at The R&A, said, “We believe that the new Rules are more in tune with what golfers would like and are easier to understand and apply for everyone who enjoys playing this great game.”
“We’re thankful for the golfers, administrators and everyone in the game who took the time to provide us with great insight and thoughtful feedback,” said USGA Senior Director of Rules & Amateur Status, Thomas Pagel. “We couldn’t be more excited to introduce the new Rules ahead of their education and implementation.”
Major proposals introduced in 2017 that have been incorporated into the modernised Rules include:
• Elimination or reduction of “ball moved” penalties: There will be no penalty for accidentally moving a ball on the putting green or in searching for a ball; and a player is not responsible for causing a ball to move unless it is “virtually certain” that he or she did so.
• Relaxed putting green rules: There will be no penalty if a ball played from the putting green hits an unattended flagstick in the hole; players may putt without having the flagstick attended or removed. Players may repair spike marks and other damage made by shoes, animal damage and other damage on the putting green and there is no penalty for merely touching the line of putt.
• Relaxed rules for “penalty areas” (currently called “water hazards”): Red and yellow-marked penalty areas may cover areas of desert, jungle, lava rock, etc., in addition to areas of water; expanded use of red penalty areas where lateral relief is allowed; and there will be no penalty for moving loose impediments or touching the ground or water in a penalty area.
• Relaxed bunker rules: There will be no penalty for moving loose impediments in a bunker or for generally touching the sand with a hand or club. A limited set of restrictions (such as not grounding the club right next to the ball) is kept to preserve the challenge of playing from the sand; however, an extra relief option is added for an unplayable ball in a bunker, allowing the ball to be played from outside the bunker with a two-stroke penalty.
• Relying on player integrity: A player’s “reasonable judgment” when estimating or measuring a spot, point, line, area or distance will be upheld, even if video evidence later shows it to be wrong; and elimination of announcement procedures when lifting a ball to identify it or to see if it is damaged.
• Pace-of-play support: Reduced time for searching for a lost ball (from five minutes to three); affirmative encouragement of “ready golf” in stroke play; recommending that players take no more than 40 seconds to play a stroke and other changes intended to help with pace of play.
Golfers can now access the official 2019 Rules of Golf by visiting RandA.org Three publications, to be distributed in September, will help players as well as officials and provide interpretation and guidance in how the Rules are applied:
The Player’s Edition of the Rules of Golf: An abridged, user-friendly set of the Rules with shorter sentences, commonly used phrases, and diagrams. Written in the “second person,” The Player’s Edition is intended to be the primary publication for golfers.
The Rules of Golf: The full edition of the Rules will be written in the third person and include illustrations. It is intended to be a more thorough version of the revised Rules.
The Official Guide to the Rules of Golf: This “guidebook” replaces the Decisions book and will contain information to best support committees and officials. It includes interpretations on the Rules, committee procedures (available local rules and information on establishing the terms of the competition), and the Modified Rules of Golf for Players with Disabilities. It is a comprehensive resource document intended as a supplementary publication.

Winter Mats

Winter Mats

2018

 

Will members please note that Winter Mats are still required for the early part of next week. ie week commencing 1 April,  due to course conditions.

 

It is hoped that this requirement will be short term and be removed during the week.

The Head Green Keeper will advise as soon as possible, please watch notice boards.

Ready Golf

This is being applied with immediate effect, i.e 9th November.

Please read below the examples which we hope will speed up the rounds without detracting from the golf.

It was trialled by the Seniors today and comments were very favourable.

“Ready golf” is not appropriate in match play due to the strategy involved between opponents and the need to have a set method for determining which player plays first. However, in stroke play formats it is only the act of agreeing to play out of turn to give one of the players an advantage that is prohibited. On this basis, it is permissible for administrators to encourage “ready golf” in stroke play, and there is strong evidence to suggest that playing “ready golf” does improve the pace of play. For example, in a survey of Australian golf clubs conducted by Golf Australia, 94% of clubs that had promoted “ready golf” to their members enjoyed some degree of success in improving pace of play, with 25% stating that they had achieved ‘satisfying success’.

When “ready golf” is being encouraged, players have to act sensibly to ensure that playing out of turn does not endanger other players.

“Ready golf” should not be confused with being ready to play, which is covered in the Player Behaviour section of this Manual.

The term “ready golf” has been adopted by many as a catch-all phrase for a number of actions that separately and collectively can improve pace of play. There is no official definition of the term, but examples of “ready golf” in action are:

  • Hitting a shot when safe to do so if a player farther away faces a challenging shot and is taking time to assess their options
  • Shorter hitters playing first from the tee or fairway if longer hitters have to wait
  • Hitting a tee shot if the person with the honour is delayed in being ready to play
  • Hitting a shot before helping someone to look for a lost ball
  • Putting out even if it means standing close to someone else’s line
  • Hitting a shot if a person who has just played from a greenside bunker is still farthest from the hole but is delayed due to raking the bunker
  • When a player’s ball has gone over the back of a green, any player closer to the hole but chipping from the front of the green should play while the other player is having to walk to their ball and assess their shot
  • Marking scores upon immediate arrival at the next tee, except that the first player to tee off marks their card immediately after teeing off

2017 Bike Ride

We are pleased to report that this years bike ride was successfully completed by all the riders yesterday.

Special thanks go tho Booths of Ditton for all their support, see picture below.

Also tho Joyce Taylor and her daughter Catherine for feeding us with bacon rolls and tea and coffee at the halfway stage and Richard Taylor for allowing the use of his home and supplying some alcoholic refreshment in the latter stages of the ride.

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Mr Captain, (support Van Driver),  Lady Captain and Gill Davis (Commercial Manager  Booths of Ditton)

 

Ready for the off, Mr Vice leads the way !!!!

First port of call.

Joyce and Angus supplying sustenance at his house, the halfway stage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All back home safely.

The riders would like to thank all members and friends for the marvelous reception we received on our return.

 

 

 

 

 

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